A centrally supported course information system which allows for the collection and dissemination of pedagogical information integrated with key administrative processes and systems at the University.

Course Information System

A centrally supported course information system which allows for the collection and dissemination of pedagogical information integrated with key administrative processes and systems at the University.

CIS is a new system which will allow for the collection and dissemination of pedagogical information as well as integration of this information with key administrative processes and systems at the University. The team gathered requirements for A&S, UTM and UTSC this past year. A pilot with two departments in Arts and Science (Economics and Geography) was successfully completed in December 2016.

In 2017 the CIS team will target additional features pertaining to submitting final exams: support for exam variants; improved change request functionality; print instructions; integration with print shops; dynamically generated exam cover sheets; collection of exam details; connections for Accessibility Services and the Library.

The final exam module will be rolled out to additional departments within A&S (Math and Computer Science to begin with) and other divisions (Engineering, UTSC and others) as demand and resources permit.

CIS will deliver two phased pilot releases in 2017 beginning with four departments in A&S (Economics, Human Biology, English and Psychology). Initial modules will include: submission of grading assessments; common syllabus policy and procedural statements; important dates and deadlines; basic course information (code, title, description, pre-requisites, learning objectives); and exploration into syllabus generating tools; syllabus archives and data sharing capabilities with the new LME and other U of T core systems.

Current Objectives

  • Continue Roll Out of CIS Exam to Economics, Geography, Comp Sci and Math
  • Implement Syllabus Components for pilot with English, Economics, Psychology, Human Biology